The Cutter Alicia

"... sailed one spring morning into a small patch of mist from where she never again emerged..."

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mid0nz:

Sherlock: The Empty Hearse Behind the Scenes:
What are We Looking At?

That’s Phoebe Arnstein, the clapper loader; Steve Lawes, the director of photography; and Jeremy Lovering, the director on the right. (x)

Steve’s holding a rig with two Canon 5D DSLR cameras attached. They filmed the tube scene simultaneously with both cameras rolling and merged the two images.

What we did use on The Empty Hearse was two cameras together in a kind of stereo converged configuration. So a lot of the stuff where he’s in his mind palace or on the tube and you see him come in and go out go back and come in, that’s a new thing we discovered on series three. The original idea of Sherlock’s point of view was always based on taking stills. I came up with the idea and Paul [McGuigan] wanted— on series one we agonized about how we would show the world differently from Sherlock’s perspective. One of the things we talked about was basically shooting the scene twice in two different styles which is a great idea but it’s kind of unfeasible in terms of production because you need twice as much time and also it’s really weird to think about how you’d do it compared to how you just shot it. We were brainstorming about ideas and I had this idea of — I’d done it in a series once before where we’d taken a series of stills from a big wide shot into somebody’s eye and then morphed them together. Basically the guy was injecting drugs and it was the idea of right at that point when he was getting high that it’s going into his pupil dilating. I was talking about this to Paul and even though he’s a very visual director he can’t understand anything unless he sees it. I remember going home with my iPhone and taking a series of stills in my front room up to my wife’s face and then compiling the little video and putting it on my phone and then taking it to work the next day which is the Sherlock vision that you know and love now and see. I’m showing him this shot and him going “yes, I really like that.” It was that idea that you start here and you go into something that you do it as a series of stills. We did that on series one which they kind of continued on series two for series three… I think it comes out of the fact that with another director they don’t necessarily understand what you’ve done before, I mean you talk to them about the idea of stills a) I’m not completely sure if they understand it but b) they want to do something different you know because it’s season three and Jeremy [Lovering] is first director and he wants to do something different. So we came up with the idea of the two 5Ds [Canon cameras] together. It was the idea that if you set a point of convergence and you have something moving at some point you’ll get these two images and they’ll come together and they’ll go apart again. It was mainly a continuation of his mind palace— just trying to visually create something different to express what goes on in Sherlock’s head. -Steve Lawes (x)

(via 221beemine)

Filed under behind the scenes the empty hearse

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I deduce, Watson, you hate being an everyman | The Sunday Times

violethuntress:

incurablylazydevil:

Martin Freeman won an Emmy last week for his role in Sherlock but summons up the fire of his new stage role as Richard III to warn against seeing him solely as a sardonic Englishman

by Josh Glancy 

Freeman as Watson with Benedict Cumberbatch’s SherlockFreeman as Watson with Benedict Cumberbatch’s Sherlock (BBC)

If they were having a race to the top, Martin Freeman would be the tortoise and Benedict Cumberbatch would be the hare. Cumberbatch, tall and unconventionally handsome, brimming with public school charm and swagger. Freeman looking like a bloke you’d meet down the pub. Cumberbatch hared to global stardom, but Freeman is running his own race; slower, less ostentatious but ever so successful.

Since their Sherlock bromance first captivated the nation in 2010, this unlikely duo have conquered Hollywood and the world. Their careers have become strangely symbiotic: Sherlock Holmes and Dr John Watson, Bilbo Baggins and Smaug the dragon, little and large. So it was no surprise when the pair won awards at last week’s Emmys. Cumberbatch as Sherlock pipped Freeman in Fargo for outstanding lead actor in a mini-series or a movie, but Freeman picked up outstanding supporting actor in a mini-series or a movie for his role as Watson.

Freeman was reading in bed when he received the news in a text from his agent. Did it feel like a bit of a consolation prize? “Yeah, I really hated it,” he says. “No, really, we’re all very pleased for each other. We all win because it’s all good for Sherlock. For a British show to be doing that well is a thrill. I emailed Ben in the morning to congratulate him and he rang me later on.”

Such is the on-screen chemistry between Cumberbatch and Freeman, there has been widespread suggestion that the Sherlock-Watson relationship is about more than just solving crimes and banter in Baker Street. Much of China is convinced the pair are lovers.

“It’s not just in China — plenty of places, plenty of households,” he says. “I don’t really quite know why that has caught on. It’s now taken on a political dimension to it. What started as a bit of fun — a slightly irreverent, sly, mocking thing — has now turned into, for some people, if you don’t think they’re gay, then you’re denying they’re gay and you are somehow homophobic. I mean genuinely — it’s that strong. It’s very odd, the fact that it has become a po-faced, political thing.”

Where does this relationship, at once fractious and deeply affectionate, come from? “Chemistry just happens or it doesn’t; you can’t work at it, you can’t manufacture it. Obviously it helps if people have got their chops about them and can actually do the work. But there are plenty of good actors who you could put together who don’t have that chemistry. We were lucky. It just worked.”

Freeman wasn’t in Los Angeles to collect his award because he is playing Richard III at the Trafalgar Studios in London’s West End. Cumberbatch wasn’t there either, leading Sherlock’s co-creator, Steven Moffat, to joke that he was “too big to come the Emmys”.

The suspicion with Freeman was that he doesn’t much fancy the gilded backslappery of Hollywood. “Look, if I wasn’t doing a play, I would definitely have been at the Emmys — I don’t mind all that. It’s nice for a little holiday, but it’s not my life. I think most of the people who were there, it’s not their life either. Everyone basically goes home to their family and puts the kettle on.”

Freeman has come a long way from playing the sales representative Tim Canterbury in The Office, but the critics have been quick to draw a thread through his work. Tim, John Watson, Bilbo Baggins, and Lester Nygaard in Fargo. The everyman, the ordinary guy everyone can identify with, the middle-of-the-road Englishman; sardonic, wry and slightly low on self-confidence.

Freeman isn’t convinced. In fact, he’s a bit fed up with it. He is generally polite and good-natured, but the merest mention of the word everyman rouses his ire. “People ask, ‘Is there any difference between Tim and John Watson?’ Well, I’m afraid if you can’t see that, you’re a f****** moron. People have no business writing about the art of television if they can’t see it.

“I’m not denying you can’t find a thread between the parts I’ve played, which you could probably do with every single other actor working. Whether it’s me or Daniel Day-Lewis — he’s not often going to play a bit-part waiter. I think a lot of it is Pavlovian; people see what they want to see.

“I have played some things that have a thread in them but that’s never been my plan. To be honest, I’ve played lots of other things, and they’ve not been that famous, they’ve not been huge hits.”

Freeman, here playing Bilbo Baggins, says it is wrong to suggest he plays only one kind of characterFreeman, here playing Bilbo Baggins, says it is wrong to suggest he plays only one kind of character (Warner Bros)

Freeman’s gig as Richard III is one of these less-famous roles. He’s garnered mixed reviews, with some critics suggesting his performance is “underpowered” and “lacks all spark and charisma”.

Is he less well suited to playing a king? “What I’m able to play in Richard III is something that I’ve had about me for as long as I’ve been acting. It’s a surprise to other people but that’s always been in there. It was all that stuff that made me want to act, it wasn’t thinking, ‘Oh, I want to be a lovelorn everyman.’”

He doesn’t have Cumberbatch’s swagger, but Freeman has plenty of confidence in himself and his acting ability. The remarkable journey of the tortoise and the hare will continue next year, when the pair are reunited for series four of Sherlock. The character of Watson has married Mary Morstan, who turned out to be a gun-toting secret agent with a murky past.

Will Sherlock leave them alone to be happily married? “Presumably not. It’s the tensions within those characters that make the show. Now that Mary is very much part of the setup, that can’t be a happy, or rather a straightforward, thing. Without the tension between John and Sherlock there is no show. So no, it won’t be un-rocky.”

So, um, like, how does he know that? Have people tweeted things at Amanda? Speechified about queer representation at events? Has he been reading Tumblr?? 

I am frightened. 

(via stephisanerd)

Filed under martin freeman interview

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I think one thing you can do to help your friends who are depressed is to reach out to them not in the spirit of helping, but in the spirit of liking them and wanting their company. “I’m here to help if you ever need me” is good to know, but hard to act on, especially when you’re in a dark place. Specific, ongoing, pleasure-based invitations are much easier to absorb. “I’m here. Let’s go to the movies. Or stay in and order takeout and watch some dumb TV.” “I’m having a party, it would be really great if you could come for a little while.” Ask them for help with things you know they are good at and like doing, so there is reciprocity and a way for them to contribute. “Will you come over Sunday and help me clear my closet of unfashionable and unflattering items? I trust your eye.” “Will you read this story I wrote and help me fix the dialogue?” “Want to make dinner together? You chop, I’ll assemble.” “I am going glasses shopping and I need another set of eyes.” Remind yourself why you like this person, and in the process, remind them that they are likable and worth your time and interest.

Talk to the parts of the person that aren’t being eaten by the depression. Make it as easy as possible to make and keep plans, if you have the emotional resources to be the initiator and to meet your friends a little more than halfway. If the person turns down a bunch of invitations in a row because (presumably) they don’t have the energy to be social, respect their autonomy by giving it a month or two and then try again. Keep the invitations simple; “Any chance we could have breakfast Saturday?” > “ARE YOU AVOIDING ME BECAUSE YOU’RE DEPRESSED OR BECAUSE YOU HATE ME I AM ONLY TRYING TO HELP YOU.” “I miss you and I want to see you” > “I’m worried about you.” A depressed person is going to have a shame spiral about how their shame is making them avoid you and how that’s giving them more shame, which is making them avoid you no matter what you do. No need for you to call attention to it. Just keep asking. “I want to see you” “Let’s do this thing.” “If you are feeling low, I understand, and I don’t want to impose on you, but I miss your face. Please come have coffee with me.” “Apology accepted. ApologIES accepted. So. Gelato and Outlander?”

#613: How do I reach out to my friends who have depression? | Captain Awkward

P.S. A lot of people with depression and other mental illnesses have trouble making decisions or choosing from a bunch of different options. “Wanna get dinner at that pizza place on Tuesday night?” is a LOT easier to answer than “So wanna hang out sometime? What do you want to do?”

(via startrekrenegades)

Yes to all of this.

(via tzikeh)

!!! I think this is the best advice for dealing with a depressed Penny EVA. Even when not depressed I think I spend about 90% of the time in a state of assuming everyone hates me and just about manages to hide it.

(via pennypaperbrain)

(via longsnowsmoon)

Filed under depression advice